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Trump signs proclamation directing troops to secure border

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2007 file photo, a National Guard unit patrols at the Arizona-Mexico border in Sasabe, Ariz. President Donald Trump said April 3, 2018, he wants to use the military to secure the U.S.-Mexico border until his promised border wall is built. The Department of Homeland Security and White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment. At the Pentagon, officials were struggling to answer questions about the plan, including rudimentary details on whether it would involve National Guard members, as similar programs in the past have done. But officials appeared to be considering a model similar to a 2006 operation in which former President George W. Bush deployed National Guard troops to the southern border in an effort to increase security and surveillance.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, file)

Asserting the situation had reached "a point of crisis," President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed a proclamation directing the deployment of the National Guard to the U.S.-Mexico border to fight illegal immigration.

"The lawlessness that continues at our southern border is fundamentally incompatible with the safety, security, and sovereignty of the American people," Trump wrote in a memo authorizing the move, adding that his administration had "no choice but to act."

The announcement came hours after Trump pledged "strong action today" on immigration and a day after he said he announced he wanted to use the military to secure the southern border until his long-promised, stalled border wall is erected.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said she had been working with governors of the southwest border states to develop agreements on where and how many Guardsmen will be deployed.

She suggested some troops could begin arriving as soon as Wednesday night, though other administration officials cautioned that details on troop levels, locations and timing were still being worked out.

Trump has been frustrated by slow action on building his "big, beautiful wall" along the Mexican border — the signature promise of his campaign — as well as a recent uptick in illegal border crossings, which had plunged during the early months of his presidency, giving Trump an accomplishment to point to when he had few.

Federal law prohibits the use of active-duty service members for law enforcement inside the U.S., unless specifically authorized by Congress. But over the past 12 years, presidents have twice sent National Guard troops to the border to bolster security and assist with surveillance and other support.

Nielsen said the effort would be similar to a 2006 operation in which President George W. Bush deployed troops to help U.S. Customs and Border Protection personnel with non-law enforcement duties while additional border agents were hired and trained. President Barack Obama also sent about 1,200 troops in 2010 to beef up efforts against drug smuggling and illegal immigration.

Nielsen said her department had developed a list of locations where it would like assistance on things like aerial surveillance and other support, and was discussing with the governors how to facilitate the plans. She declined to say how many personnel would be needed or how much the operation would cost, but she insisted, "It will be as many as is needed to fill the gaps that we have today."

One congressional aide said that lawmakers anticipate 300 to 1,200 troops will be deployed and that the cost was expected to be at least $60 million to $120 million a year. The Pentagon would probably need authorization from Congress for any funding beyond a few months, said the aide, who wasn't authorized to speak publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Under the mechanism the administration is looking to use, the Guard would not be mobilized as a federal force. Instead, governors would control the Guard within their states.

Governors of the four U.S. states bordering Mexico were largely supportive of the move. The office of California Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat who has sparred with Trump on immigration issues, said any federal request would be promptly reviewed to determine how the state could best offer its assistance.

The Mexican foreign ministry said Nielsen told Mexico's top diplomat that troops deployed to the border "will not carry arms or carry out migration or customs control activities."

Senators in Mexico urged President Enrique Pena Nieto to temporarily suspend cooperation with the U.S. on immigration and security issues. In a nonbinding statement approved unanimously Wednesday, the senators asked Mexico's government to freeze joint efforts "in the fight against transnational organized crime" until Trump starts acting "with the civility and respect that the people of Mexico deserve."

Trump first revealed Tuesday that he'd been discussing the idea of using the military at the border with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.

"We're going to be doing things militarily. Until we can have a wall and proper security, we're going to be guarding our border with the military," Trump said.

He spent the first months of his presidency bragging about a dramatic drop in illegal border crossings, which some DHS officials had even dubbed the "Trump effect." Indeed, arrests at the border last April were at the lowest level since DHS was created in 2003, and the 2017 fiscal year saw a 45-year low for Border Patrol arrests.

But the numbers have been slowly ticking up since last April and are now on par with many months of the Obama administration. New statistics released Wednesday show about 50,000 arrests of people trying to cross the southwest border last month, a 37 percent increase from the previous month, and a 203 percent increase compared to March 2017. The monthly increase follows typical seasonal fluctuations.

Trump's new focus on hard-line immigration policies appears aimed, at least in part, in drawing a political contrast with Democrats heading into the midterm elections. He has also been under growing pressure from conservative backers who have accused him of betraying his base for not delivering on the wall, and he was set off by images played on his favorite network, Fox News, of a "caravan" of migrants making their way through Mexico.

In Texas, which already has about 100 National Guard members stationed on the border, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, said the president's decision "reinforces Texas' longstanding commitment to secure our southern border and uphold the Rule of Law."

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, a Republican, said she appreciated the Trump administration's efforts to involve states in the effort to better secure the border. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, also a Republican, tweeted that his state "welcomes the deployment of National Guard to the border. Washington has ignored this issue for too long and help is needed."

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Associated Press writers Lolita C. Baldor, Matthew Daly and Robert Burns in Washington and Nomaan Merchant in Houston contributed to this report.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott issued a statement after the decision to deploy troops to the Mexican border was made:

My top priority as Governor is ensuring the safety and security of Texans, and securing our southern border has always been essential to that mission," said Governor Abbott. "In my time as Governor, Texas has maintained a continuous presence of National Guard members along the border, and we’ve added hundreds of permanent Department of Public Safety troopers to the region. Today’s action by the Trump Administration reinforces Texas’ longstanding commitment to secure our southern border and uphold the Rule of Law, and I welcome the support. Going forward, Texas will continue to implement robust border security efforts, and this partnership will help ensure we are doing everything we can to stem the flow of illegal immigration.

State Rep. Cesar Blanco does not agree with the decision. He sent the following statement after the announcement:

Trump's deployment of the National Guard to our border communities is unjustified, irresponsible, and dangerous. In 2017, apprehensions for illegal border crossing hit a 46-year low — a 23.4% drop from 2016. Some of our border communities, such as El Paso, are consistently ranked as some of the safest communities in the country.
This President is out of touch with reality and has consistently demonstrated his disregard for our border communities and Latinos. Demonizing and militarizing our border only hurts our local communities, families, and economy.
Deploying the National Guard to our border is a solution in search of a problem. This is politics at its worst. While Trump panders to his right wing base, our border communities and taxpayers are paying the price.

Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico issued the following statement:

This vague and hostile announcement is another pitiful attempt to distract attention from the dangerous chaos the president is creating, including disruption in the stock market, a trade war with China, saber rattling with North Korea, numerous accusations of sexual misconduct by the president, mounting news reports that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and others in his cabinet are improperly spending taxpayer dollars on themselves while doling out favors to their industry campaign donors, and of course, Russia's interference in the 2016 election and evidence that it plans to do the same in November.
"I stand with New Mexico families and businesses who oppose Trump’s offensive effort to militarize the border and build an obscenely expensive and ineffective wall in our backyard, and that’s why I have voted against funding it multiple times. When it comes to the needs on the border, even President Trump's own chief of staff -- the former Homeland Security secretary -- has acknowledged that the vast majority of illegal drugs being smuggled into the United States come through our ports of entry. The facts simply don't support what the president is proposing. And the law doesn't allow him to unilaterally use troops in the United States to enforce domestic laws. Smart border technology and more customs officers would be a much more effective and efficient security investment, that would also benefit our economy and relations with Mexico. The money saved could be invested in the infrastructure improvements that President Trump promised and that New Mexico and American communities really need, and I would welcome the opportunity to work with him -- or anyone -- on rebuilding roads, bridges, schools, clean water systems, broadband, and other improvements, which will strengthen the economy and create jobs.


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