Undocumented parents asked to take fingerprints, DNA tests to be reunited with their kids

Undocumented parents asked to take fingerprints, DNA tests to be reunited with their kids

Undocumented parents in El Paso are still waiting to be reunited with their children.

Local nonprofit organizations are working with those parents but said the situation is difficult.

Christian was separated from his daughter at the border. He's been in touch with her through a social worker.

"My daughter’s social worker told me she needed my fingerprints for me to get my daughter back," said Christian.

Parents are being asked to send original birth certificates, take fingerprints, take a DNA test and buy a plane ticket for their child and a round-trip ticket for an escort.

Ruben Garcia is the director of Annunciation House, a local refugee shelter.

Garcia said many birth certificates are being held by the initial detaining federal agency, which makes them inaccessible to parents while their case is being processed.

"It's a really unfortunate system that we’ve ended up with, especially when you consider that we’re the ones that took the child away from the parents," said Garcia.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the American Civil Liberties Union, which first presented the lawsuit against the separation policy, are discussing the procedures the government will follow to reunite families.

The government said it will reunite about half of the roughly 100 children under age 5 who were separated from their parents.

The deadline for the other roughly 2,000 undocumented children 5 years and older to be reunited with their parents is set for July 26.

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